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Newest Oldest Building Found 2006-03-26

Posted by clype in Discovery, Glasgow, Humanities.
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A 'time team' have made a breakthrough discovery after unearthing a medieval bishop's palace dating back to the 14th century. The archaeologists claim they have uncovered Glasgow's oldest building after finding the ruins. The palace, which sits in Easterhouse in the east end of the city, is believed to date back to 1323 and knocks the current title holder off the historical top spot.

Until now it was thought that 'Provan Hall', built between 1460 and 1480, was the oldest building in the city. But the team of investigators, from 'Headland Archaeology', believe they have unlocked more secrets of the city's forgotten past. Silver coins dating back to the 13th and 14th century and pottery have been discovered on the private land.

Councillor Ms.Catherine Mcmaster, chairman of working group 'Medieval Glasgow', says the find has opened up a new chapter and could boost tourism links. She said:

 

'The bishop's palace is older than the Provan Hall. It means we have data on Glasgow's history that we did not have before.'

The exact location of the bishop's residence in Easterhouse is being kept under wraps by officials as work continues into the find. They discovered the residence was surrounded by a moat wall that was used more for visual effect than defence. But experts said it was a substantial building. Mr.Neil Baxter, director of 'The Glasgow Preservation Trust', said:

'We have always believed that until its great trading period started, the city was a minor place.

'But Glasgow is actually older, bigger and better than we imagined.'

The city has been known for its industrial history, but little has been known about its mediaeval past. City and council leaders are calling for more to be done to promote Glasgow's heritage and claim it will be a major tourist attraction.

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