jump to navigation

Dali’s “Christ of St.John of The Cross: Nuclear Mysticism” Returns Home 2006-06-03

Posted by clype in Glasgow, Humanities, Intolerance.
Tags: , ,
trackback

The Late Salvadore Dali’s masterpiece, ‘Christ of Saint John of the Cross: Nuclear Mysticism’, was returned to its original Scottish home on 2006-06-02.

The painting was unveiled at Glasgow’s ‘Kelvingrove’ Gallery as the museum approached the finishing stages of a 27 million GBP overhaul.

An iconic image and one of the best-known works of art in Scotland, it was first hung at the ‘Kelvingrove’ Gallery more than 50 years ago.

The picture, famous for the way the Spanish painter depicts the Christ figure on the cross from above, was bought for just 8 200 GBP in 1952 but is now thought to be worth tens of millions.

Dali painted his crucifixion scene set above the rocky harbour of his home village of Port Lligat in Spain.

‘Christ of St John of the Cross: Nuclear Mysticism’ has been shown at ‘The St.Mungo Museum of Religious Life & Art‘ since 1993, but returned to ‘Kelvingrove’ ahead of the gallery’s re-opening on 2006-07-11.

Nuclear Mysticism -- S.Dal�

Glasgow City’s Lord Provost, Ms.Liz Cameron, unveiled the painting.

‘It is fantastic to see “the Dali”, our greatest painting, hanging in its spiritual home at “Kelvingrove”,’ she said.

Advertisements

Comments»

1. Clipped News » Kelvingrove Re-Opens - 2006-07-22

[…] Dali’s “Christ of St.John of The Cross: Nuclear Mysticism” Returns Home 2006-06-03 […]

2. devine » Kelvingrove - 2006-07-23

[…] I remember spending hours with my sketchpad inside the cool, peaceful and quiet interior. It had the feel of a church or cathedral about it, it demanded respect and good behaviour “sssssssh”… you would never be able to do that anymore. I noticed that the Dali was back and in it’s original place… that seems to be a popular choice — and they seem to have decided not to bother protecting this painting in any special way, which I found surprising to be honest. It was better protected when it was housed in the Religious Museum at St Mungo’s Protestant Cathedral. It seems incredible, but when the picture was vandalised, it was in this exact same place! Crazy! […]


Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: